Remove Bunions Without Surgery: It Is Possible!

· March 26, 2018
Bunions can be really annoying. Do you know how to get rid of them? Find out more in this article!

Having bunions can be really painful. But the pain can be even more agonizing after the operation. For this reason, many people opt to remove bunions “naturally,” that is to say, without surgery.

More important than the aesthetic question, most people affected by bunions can’t stand the pain caused when walking or when wearing certain shoes all day long.

Because of this, they look to see if there is any homemade remedy to remove bunions, and it turns out that “Yes! There is!” If you’re persistent and disciplined, the following methods could help. So read on to learn how to remove bunions without surgery and achieve the desired results.

Learn to Remove Bunions Without Surgery

pointed shoes for women

You could remove bunions in the early stages, slow or even stop their progression and alleviate pain by following the tips below.

  • Comfortable Shoes

To remove bunions without resorting to surgery, you have to begin by making sure that your feet are comfortable. To do this, you need to wear light, comfortable shoes. They shouldn’t press your feet or cause pain.

With comfortable shoes, your bunions will bother you less and also make your skin softer. We also recommend that you not wear pointed shoes or high heels since they make the position of your bunions worse. The best thing to do is to wear sandals. They give a bit more freedom to your feet if you require something for formal dress.

Read: 5 Tips to Prevent Your New Shoes from Hurting You

  • Bare Feet

You could remove bunions in the early stages with good habits. At home, instead of wearing shoes, you should walk around barefoot. In this way, the joints of your toes will strengthen. Moreover, you will have less pain.

We also recommend that, at the beach, you walk barefoot since it can actually be a form of exercise for your joints which helps to cure bunions completely.

  • Foot Exercises

Foot exercises to remove bunions

There are many exercises which are ideal for getting rid of bunions in the early stages without surgery. These manage to slow down the growth of bunions. They can also help improve the angle of the big toe.

The best exercise consists in doing toe stretches. Firt, stretch out your toes. Then flex all your toes. After that, press them firmly on the floor or against a wall, so that they double back on themselves. Practice this exercise for about 10 seconds and repeat 3 times every day.

You might like: Calluses on Your Feet? Get Rid of Them with This 100% Natural Solution

  • Permanent Alignment of Your Toes

You could also cure a bunion by aligning your toes. In order to do this, wrap your whole foot in a bandage,(including your toes, in a normal position) and separate the big toe from the rest with a crossover or with a separate bandage. Little by little, your toes will adapt to a better position, thus stopping the development of you bunion.

This habit will keep your feet in a better position. It’s important to do it daily and make it a habit so that your bunions will cause you less pain when walking. If you can’t manage to do this yourself, it’s best that you consult a medical specialist to see if they can help you do it more easily.

What You Shouldn’t Do

pointe shoes

If you suffer from bunions in the early stages and you want to get rid of them completely without surgery, there are activities that you need to avoid.  One of them is ballet, which, despite being a very elegant form of dance, also has bad consequences for your feet, in particular the bones in your toes.

Besides, you should pay close attention to any activities that cause you greater pain with your bunions. The more care you take of your feet, the easier it’ll be to effectively get rid of your bunions.

You could get rid of those bumps on your big toe with just these methods, for which you just need time and patience. That way you won’t get to the stage where surgery is the only option.

  • Nguyen, U. S. D. T., Hillstrom, H. J., Li, W., Dufour, A. B., Kiel, D. P., Procter-Gray, E., … Hannan, M. T. (2010). Factors associated with hallux valgus in a population-based study of older women and men: the MOBILIZE Boston Study. Osteoarthritis and Cartilage. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2009.07.008
  • Perera, A. M., Mason, L., & Stephens, M. M. (2011). The pathogenesis of hallux valgus. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - Series A. https://doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.H.01630