Tips and Home Remedies to Stop Snoring

· February 2, 2016
It's hard to stop snoring at the drop of a hat, but there are some natural ways to help alleviate this problem.

An estimated 45% of adults snore at least sometimes. Snoring occurs when your tongue, the palate, and the uvula vibrate against your tonsils and lymph nodes. Generally speaking, snoring is a sign that you may be overweight or obese. It’s also associated with the common cold, allergies, drinking too much alcohol before going to bed, and smoking.

Whatever the cause, snoring can be very annoying for the people around you who have to endure it. Additionally, most snorers suffer from poor sleep quality because they’re waking themselves up several times in the night.

Although it’s difficult to stop snoring at the drop of a hat, there are some natural ways to help reduce its severity. If you find that you snore on a regular basis, it’s a good idea to talk to your doctor and rule out any problems you could be having with your respiratory system.

Tips to stop snoring

A man snoring in bed next to a woman.

  • Sleep on your side: When you sleep on your back, your tongue and palate fall toward the back of the throat, blocking your airway and causing you to snore. If you have trouble sleeping on your side, a few tricks might help, including sleeping with a tennis ball behind you. If you start to roll onto your back, the ball will be uncomfortable enough to return you to your side.

Also Read: Eucalyptus to Relieve Respiratory Problems

  • Use extra pillows: Try sleeping with additional pillows to make your head higher than the rest of your body. This keeps your airway open and prevents snoring.
  • Lose weight: If you’re overweight or obese, it’s important to consider all the options for weight loss if you really want to stop snoring. Being overweight causes a lot of health problems. Specifically, it’s a major cause of snoring.

See Also: Finding the Perfect Time to Quit Smoking

  • Quit smoking: Smoking irritates and inflames your upper respiratory system, which causes you to snore more heavily. Avoiding cigarettes is a good decision when it comes to stopping the snoring and improving your overall quality of life.
  • Avoid alcohol before bedtime: Drinking within three hours of going to bed can make your tongue, tonsils, and the roof of your mouth relax, causing a loud vibration every time you breathe during sleep.

Remedies for snoring

Mint next to a teacup.

  • Gargle with mint: When snoring is caused by a cold or an allergy, one traditional remedy is to gargle with mint before going to bed. To do this, add a drop of peppermint oil to a glass of cold water and gargle – don’t swallow. Another option is to prepare mint tea and gargle with the liquid.
  • Nettle tea: If your snoring is caused by allergies or other respiratory problems, it’s important keep your room free from any allergens. Also, drink a cup of nettle tea that you can make by adding a teaspoon of dried leaves to boiling water. Cover and let it steep for five minutes. Experts consider nettle to be a natural antihistamine.
  • Exercise: In addition to helping you lose weight (another way to fight this problem), getting exercise can help you snore less. Start by getting at least 30 minutes of exercise a day and soon you’ll start seeing the difference.

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