Meeting the Perfect Person at the Right Moment is Magical

· October 8, 2017
Meeting the perfect person can happen to you if you're open to the experience. Sociability is a key part of human life.

Sociability and the continuous, deep desire to meet people and make enjoyable connections have always been at the core of human existence. Of course, meeting the perfect person is one of the goals of this drive.

Aristotle was already talking about it in his time. Later on, the Austrians Alfred Adler and Rudolf Dreikurs were the first doctors to deal with the issue of sociability in a vigorous theoretical and empirical way.

Plus, we can’t leave out Abraham Maslow’s classic hierarchy of needs.

Without a doubt, seeking acceptance, affection, friendship, love and belonging defines us as humans and guarantees our survival.

That said, if there’s one thing that we all know, it’s that it’s not easy to meet people who connect with your being, your values, your identity, hobbies and your passions.

It’s also important to remember that for a great friendship or a healthy relationship, it’s not necessary to agree on everything completely.

Instead, there’s something more intangible, something we have trouble defining, that cultivates those truly magical bonds.

From time to time, and almost without even knowing how, we simply “connect” with someone. We’ve had the experience of meeting the perfect person at the right time, just when you need them most.

If this has ever happened to you, you’ll be interested in our ideas on this marvelous phenomenon.

Meeting the perfect person: the power of connection

A person with a rainbow in their hands.

Louise Hawkley is a scientist at the University of Chicago and is a specialist in researching psycho-social phenomena.

According to her, the majority of these special bonds, stable friendships ans strong relationships that we don’t know how to define are characterized by sharing aspects that build what we often call “connectivity:”

  • Intimate connectivity is the first of these, and refers to the most private aspect of the self.
    • When you first meet someone you almost immediately feel whether this person harmonizes or connects with your being. It’s apparent whether we feel understood, and whether there’s chemistry.
    • It’s like a natural instinct that’s strongly related to intuition.
  • The second aspect is defined as relational connectivity and refers to the frequency with which we come into contact with the person.
    • Often, when we meet someone, we don’t feel particular interest in them.
    • However, when there is true connectivity, the daily complicity of “Good morning, how are you?”, “I’ve been thinking about…” or “Let’s do something together” strengthens the relationship.
  • Lastly, there’s collective connectivity which refers to how comfortably the person integrates with your closest personal nucleus (family, friends…).

Read also: How to Build a Great Relationship with Your Partner

The power of intuition: the sixth sense that guides you to the right people

Meeting the perfect person is like finding the right key.

Finding a special person or people isn’t easy.

The majority of us have suffered from disappointment. After all, we’ve all placed our hopes and dreams in people who at some point have failed us or simply weren’t what we thought.

Similarly, we ourselves will all have disappointed someone. You may even have decided to distance yourself from someone who was unwilling at some point.

All these dynamics are normal in your life cycle. They’re a part of this timeline during which you acquire experiences and wisdom. These make your sixth sense ever sharper and more awake.

Never forget or undervalue the power of your intuition.

After all, your intuition almost always accurately assesses new people you meet based on your internal criteria. So meeting the perfect person involves subconscious approval.

Read: 5 Signs That Show Your Intuitive Intelligence

How does your intuition work when you meet someone?

The shadows of a woman and a man.

Our intuition is not a supernatural, magical, or extrasensorial power.

  • In reality, it’s your brain’s ability to give you fast opinions or information based on what it finds in your subconscious.
  • This exceptional, intimate storehouse hides the essence of your whole being. These are your past experiences, your emotions, your identity, hidden desires, needs, values, memories…
  • What the intuition does is travel quickly into this storehouse. It dives into the spectacular garden of your subconscious to consult with it. It quickly searches to find an answer or explanation.

When you meet someone, your subconscious makes a fast assessment based on who you are and what defines you. Then, it quickly sends you a sensation – a strange prod or tickle – that appears in your mind and constitutes your intuition or a “hunch.”

This influences whether you trust someone or not. It tells you whether it’s worth seeing them again or giving them your phone number, etc.

In conclusion, it’s always a good idea to listen to your inner voice and take it seriously.

Magical connections happen every day. However, remember, if your aim is meeting the perfect person: you must be receptive, go with the flow and pay attention to what’s around you in order to find them.

Main image courtesy of: © wikiHow.com

Hawkley, L. C., & Cacioppo, J. T. (2010). Loneliness matters: A theoretical and empirical review of consequences and mechanisms. Annals of Behavioral Medicine. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12160-010-9210-8

Hawkley, L. C., Browne, M. W., & Cacioppo, J. T. (2005). How can i connect with thee? Let me count the ways. Psychological Science. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9280.2005.01617.x

Harding, S., & Long, T. (2018). Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. In MBA Management Models. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351218948-27

Cacioppo, J. T., & Hawkley, L. C. (2009). Perceived social isolation and cognition. Trends in Cognitive Sciences. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tics.2009.06.005

Ferguson, E. D. (2001). Adler and Dreikurs: Cognitive-Social Dynamic Innovators. Journal of Individual Psychology.