The Top Tips for Cutting Cheese

September 3, 2019
Did you know that the shape of the cheese to cut determines how you should cut it? If you never took this into account before, you've probably been cutting cheese wrong! In this article, we'll share some tricks and tips.

Nowadays, there are many tricks for cutting cheese. While it may seem to be a simple task, you have to know how to do it correctly. Each type of cheese requires different handling, depending on its shape and properties.

Do you want to know how to cut cheese correctly? If so, keep reading!

Some types of cheese are difficult to cut, especially due to their texture. When you cut them, they can come apart, stick to the knife, or generally lose their shape. For this reason, it’s important to learn how to cut each type of cheese correctly.

The top tricks for cutting cheese

The problem of not knowing how to cut cheese properly is that you can ruin its shape, therefore making it hard to serve on dishes. This is why you should learn the best tips for cutting cheese by shape or type.

Round, small, and flat cheeses

Several types of cheese.

Round, small, and flat cheeses such as Camembert should be cut into triangular wedges, like if you were cutting a cake. You should start from the center and work your way to the edges. Also, you should make sure to use a sharp knife.

  • A trick so the cheese you’re going to cut doesn’t stick to the knife is to dip the utensil in hot water before cutting. (Of course, then dry it well before using it).

Read on: Make this Delicious Vegetable and Soft Cheese Quiche

Tricks for cutting brie cheese

Brie cheese and other round cheeses should be cut into large wedges, which should then be cut in half. For these types of cheeses, you can use a wire cheese cutter or a cheese knife.

  • You can use the first trick to cut Brie cheese. However, if you want to try something different, dip the knife into oil before cutting.

Log cheeses

Log cheeses, such as goat cheese, are often used to make salads and toast. Goat cheese and other log cheeses are very delicious. It’s best to cut these cheeses into thick slices.

  • The trick here is to use a sharp knife. You can dip the knife in hot water after each slice to ensure better results.

Hard cheeses

Cheddar cheese.

You should cut hard cheeses triangularly, ideally at room temperature.

Hard cheeses are those that have undergone pressure to ensure they remain compact. The age of the cheese determines its degree of consistency. We recommend cutting hard cheeses at room temperature with a double-handled knife.

  1. First of all, cut the cheese in half.
  2. Then, cut it into triangular wedges.
  3. Finally, cut the wedges into small equal triangles.

Tips for cutting Parmesan cheese

As you probably already know, Parmesan cheese is used to make pasta, lasagna, and other typical Italian cuisine dishes. Although this is a very hard cheese, it doesn’t require a special type of cut. In fact, all you have to do is grate it or make Parmesan chips.

  • Just take the cheese and cut it into irregular pieces or grate it and sprinkle on your favorite dishes.

Before you go, don’t miss: Types of Cheese and Their Nutritional Value

Blue cheese

Cheeses such as Roquefort or Cabrales are semisolid and hard to cut due to the fat they contain. In fact, don’t expect a perfect cut. If you want a cleaner cut, you should ideally use a wire cheese cutter.

You can cut blue cheese this way:

  • Cut the cheese into fan-shaped wedges by slicing diagonally across.

A trick for cutting all types of cheese

As a bonus, we decided to share a curious trick that you can use to cut all types of cheese. In fact, you won’t even need a knife. Instead, all you have to do is buy unflavored dental floss!

  1. Cut a length of dental floss longer than the cheese.
  2. After that, slice the cheese with the dental floss.

Repeat until you’re satisfied with the cut.

Did you know these tricks for cutting cheeses? If you always ruined cheese because you didn’t know how to cut it properly, start applying what you learned today!