7 Foods that Increase Uric Acid Levels

When uric acid levels are high in your bloodstream, it can result in arthritis or gout. Learn about some of the main food culprits and how to avoid them.
7 Foods that Increase Uric Acid Levels
Carlos Fabián Avila

Written and verified by Doctor Carlos Fabián Avila.

Last update: 20 May, 2022

When uric acid is found in high values ​​in the blood, that’s when it causes the appearance of arthritis or gout, according to this report by the Mayo Clinic. By accumulating in the fluid present in the joints, it causes inflammation and pain, mainly affecting the toes and ankles.

That’s why having regular blood tests and keeping a balanced diet are two of the keys to preventing this problem.

Foods that increase uric acid levels

1 – Seafood

These foods are rich in purines, so you should eat them in moderation if you have high uric acid levels. Among them are crabs, shrimp, oysters, clams, and mussels. This is confirmed by this study carried out by the University Hospital of Burgos (Spain), which generally includes all groups of fish.

Foods from this group should be avoided both in fresh and canned forms, as even processed shellfish can increase uric acid levels in the blood.

Visit this article: 8 foods that cause gout

2 – Red meat

Red meat uric acid
Whenever red meat is consumed in moderation, it can be alright for uric acid levels.

This is the food that is most commonly responsible for an increase in uric acid levels. You should avoid it completely if you have a problem with this substance.

Pork and beef both contain large amounts of purines. Fatty meats, minced meat, kidneys, and viscera are other culprits.

3 – Legumes

Some vegetables should be eaten in moderation if you have high uric acid levels. These include asparagus, mushrooms, cauliflower, spinach, radishes, and leeks.

4 – Vegetables

Some vegetables that you should eat in moderation or avoid if you have problems with uric acid include: asparagus, mushrooms, cauliflower, spinach, radishes, and leeks.

5 – Alcoholic drinks

Beer is actually more harmful to people with high uric acid levels than shellfish or red meat. This is because it increases your body’s production of this acid and makes elimination more difficult.

Specialists in the field recommend avoiding beer if you suffer from gout. This is confirmed by this study carried out by the Clinical Hospital of Valladolid (Spain).

6 – Sugary drinks and sweet desserts

Soft drinks and processed fruit juices contain corn syrup that will stimulate the production of uric acid. Industrial pastries, cookies, cakes, and the like are also loaded with sugar that will worsen your condition.

7 – Coffee

If you drink too much coffee, it can be harmful to your health, so it’s best to drink only one or two cups a day at the most.

Symptoms of high uric acid levels

According to information obtained by the National Library of Medicine of the United States, when uric acid levels are very high, gout and kidney stones occur, the most common symptoms are, among others:

  • Pain in the big toe
  • Intense pain and inflammation in the joints
  • Difficulty urinating
  • A racing pulse
  • Pain in the knees
  • Kidney stones
  • Fatigue
  • Hard lumps around the joint areas

A doctor should make the correct diagnosis and prescribe a treatment regimen that will include changes to your diet.

Do you want to know more? Read: Symptoms and treatment for gout

Treatments for uric acid

Uric acid
It’s crucial to see a doctor to get conventional treatment when faced with any alterations in uric acid levels.
  • On the one hand, the pain is quite annoying, but there are measures that can alleviate the problem. For example, apply cold compresses to sore joints, a recommendation from this study by the University of the Americas (Chile).
  • Likewise, the doctor may prescribe non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, if she or he sees fit, since they can provide great relief.
  • On the other hand, they may recommend drugs at the beginning in low doses, which can be increased over time, always recommended by the doctor.
  • The treatment time can be between 6 and 12 months.
  • During this period, you should take care of your diet and perform light to moderate-intensity physical exercise regularly.

A sample diet to lower uric acid levels

The diet must have a concentration of protein from eggs and dairy. The latter are highly recommended, according to this study conducted by the Hyogo College of Medicine (Japan). Rabbit can be included, since it’s the meat with the lowest fat content and has a low concentration of purines and cholesterol.

Breakfast

Mid-morning snack

  • 1 banana

Lunch

  • Gnocchi with tomato sauce
  • Grilled white fish
  • Natural unsweetened yogurt for dessert

Afternoon snack

  • 1 slice of watermelon

Dinner

  • Eggplant Parmesan
  • A salad made with tomato, carrots, and basil

This is an idea and you can change the elements. It’s simply important to keep in mind that proteins, vegetables, fruits, and grains must be balanced. Thus, there will be a low and proportionate fat content.

Remember: This article is for informational purposes. In no way can it be carried out without consulting a doctor.

Likewise, your doctor will also recommend a suitable diet if your levels are above normal.

In short, taking care of your health is the most important treasure you have...And no one but you can do it.



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