Symptoms and Treatment for Gout

· April 25, 2015
Gout is a condition that affects the joints, causing extreme pain and inflammation. Do you know gout's treatment and symptoms?

Gout is a condition that affects the joints, causing extreme pain and inflammation.  This condition is most common in the big toe, although it can occur in other parts of the body.  Gout is caused by an accumulation of uric acid in large amounts in the joints, and generally occurs in older individuals. Keep reading if you would like to learn more about the symptoms and treatment for gout.

What symptoms does gout cause?

Gout causes extreme pain in the affected joint, along with inflammation, and red and shiny skin.  Often times this is accompanied by a mild fever.  When this condition continues over the course of one’s life, it could create what is known as tophus (hard nodules formed by uric acid that has stuck to the area around the joint).

Read more: Effective Natural Remedies to Treat Gout

What treatment is recommended to alleviate gout?

The most recommendable treatment for gout and reducing its symptoms is to very carefully raise the joint, trying to avoid forcing the movement in any way possible.  Apply ice to the area for 10 minutes.  With this simple procedure, both inflammation and pain will be reduced.  It is important to drink enough water and to maintain a healthy weight.

During a medical exam, your doctor may recommend a few anti-inflammatories that could help reduce inflammation and control pain.  These need to be prescribed by your treating physician, and they should never be consumed unauthorized.  These medications could produce side effects.

You must keep in mind that individuals prone to suffering from this health condition should avoid red meat, seafood, innards, concentrated broths, yeast – both in beer and pastries – and alcohol, along with other foods that could increase uric acid production.

You might also like: Do You Suffer from Gout? Avoid These 7 Foods

Individuals with gout should consume the following foods:

Foods like white meat, fish, whole grains or grains with germ, sodas, asparagus, spinach, and mushrooms should be consumed very moderately, avoiding them in excess at all costs.

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