The Benefits of Ginger for Women

Ginger is a root with many benefits, traditionally used by many cultures because of its curative properties. Many of them are essential for the well-being of women, like heating up cold feet, increasing libido during menopause, preventing nausea during pregnancy, or accelerating metabolism, for example.

Below, we will explain the benefits of ginger for women and also the different ways that you can eat it, as well as some original and delicious ways to use it in the kitchen.

Ginger

Ginger (Zingiber officinale), used for ages in the East, has a very peculiar flavor. It is slightly sweet, refreshing, and spicy. The part that you use is the rhizome because of its properties.

Ginger-Chiots-Run

Health Benefits for Women

Eating ginger regularly gives you the following benefits:




  • Anti-inflammatory and a natural painkiller: Ginger is recommended for naturally treating inflammatory or painful diseases like arthritis, arthrosis, fibromyalgia, or chronic fatigue.
  • Digestive: It helps treat poor digestion, flatulence, gastritis, gastric ulcers, diarrhea, etc. It also works as a stomach protector when drinking alcohol or taking medication.
  • Throat infections: It helps treat throat infection and inflammation and is very useful for loss of voice and professional singers.
  • Nausea and vomiting: It is especially recommended during the first months of pregnancy because it does not cause side effects to the fetus or the mother. It is also a great supplement during chemotherapy for cancer treatment.
  • It helps prevent sea sickness.
  • It provides heat: Ginger has a high calorific value if you consume it or apply it externally. We especially recommend it for cold people and during cold seasons. During hot times of the year, you should remember that it increases sweating.
  • It accelerates metabolism: This calorific property also boosts your metabolism, which is very useful if you want to lose weight.
  • It increases libido: Ginger is a natural aphrodisiac. We recommend making a ginger and powdered cinnamon preparation with honey and taking a tablespoon a day.
  • It prevents cardiovascular disease and boosts circulation: However, if you are taking medication it can interfere with that. You should consult your doctor.

How to Consume It

You can consume it in many ways:

  • Raw root: You can grate it and add it to all kinds of recipes.
  • Powdered: To do this treatment, we recommend consuming it in powder form to be able to control the dosage. We recommend not going over 2 grams a day and to always consult a professional doctor.
  • Crystalized: Crystallized ginger is easy to find today in herbal, dietary, or sweet stores. You should keep in mind that it has a high sugar content.
  • In infusions: A hot infusion of this is ideal for people who are sensitive to cold.
  • Fresh juice: Fresh ginger juice, when not abused, allows you to give an original and medicinal touch to apple, pineapple, carrot, etc. juices.
  • Essential oil: If you find it as an essential oil, you can use it to give massages and for cold feet, for example. Mix it with your usual moisturizing cream and massage your feet well. In a short amount of time, you will note the great amount of heat it gives off.

ginger-sweets

Original Recipes

You can include ginger in any of these ways in any kind of recipe. It will help you, for example, give a juicy and refreshing touch to cakes, sweets, cookies, or homemade bread recipes.

You can also boil it with milk or a vegetable beverage, along with cinnamon, star anise, and turmeric. You will get a delicious spiced drink to warm yourself up.

In Japanese cooking, pickled ginger is used to accompany sushi plates. You may have never noticed, but it looks like an orange sheet with a very special flavor. The Japanese add it to cleanse their palate after eating raw fish.

Lastly, crystallized ginger allows you to decorate sweet and salty recipes very originally. You can also put it in hot chocolate and let it cool in the refrigerator to make some delicious sweets with a spicy touch.

Images courtesy of Chiot’s Run adn Renée S. Suen