What Is the Lipophilic Diet and How to Follow it the Right Way

October 26, 2019
Although its results can be very striking, it's essential to consult a physician before starting the lipophilic diet to avoid complications.

Since people are always looking for new ways to lose weight, new options that promise to help you lose pounds are appearing every day. Today, we’re going to talk about the lipophilic diet, which has become quite popular.

This diet promises to help you lose 40 to 60 pounds in about four months. This is an extreme diet you shouldn’t follow indefinitely since it doesn’t allow you to consume foods from certain food groups.

What Is the Lipophilic Diet?

The lipophilic diet is an eating plan based on consuming natural foods while avoiding any processing. It allows fruits and vegetables in small portions.

Packaged foods, whether natural or processed, are completely forbidden. Any foods that contain fats, salt, or artificial sweeteners are also forbidden.

What Is the Goal of the Lipophilic Diet?

The main goal of this diet is to avoid the consumption of processed foods. It’s no secret that most of these foods cause health problems (diabetes or hypertension) and damage several internal organs if consumed in large quantities.

The diet seeks to reverse the negative effects of processed foods by reducing their consumption. However, remember that some diseases aren’t reversible. Some even require lifelong care, so you shouldn’t neglect your medical follow-up when you start this diet.

Take a look at this article: A Weekly Diet to Lower Triglycerides 

How to Follow This Diet

lipophilic diet

The lipophilic diet has two stages:

Stage 1

In this first stage, you have to adapt to your new lifestyle. It lasts four months and is usually the most complicated and strict stage. During this stage, you have to get used to the new ways to prepare foods and may feel really hungry if you don’t consume the right portions.

In addition, meal times during this stage are very strict and can’t be changed. It’s recommended to eat every 120 minutes to speed up metabolism and help burn fat.

Stage 2

This stage focuses on maintaining the results achieved in the previous stage. In theory, it should last about four months, but some people choose to extend it.

Before making the decision to start this diet, consult your doctor and get the necessary lab tests done to determine if it’s a good idea for your overall health or not.

Discover: Try This Effective Diet to Reduce Bad Cholesterol

Foods to Avoid

As you may have already realized, you have to cut off many foods to follow this diet. Basically, you have to avoid anything that doesn’t come from nature and can’t eat in their unmodified form. However, there are also some natural foods you should avoid, such as alcohol, sugar, and vinegar.

You also can’t eat proteins such as salmon and sausages.

In addition, you have to avoid fruits that are high in sugar. The most common ones are bananas, melons, figs, and pineapple. You also have to eliminate cucumber, eggplant, cauliflower, and carrots.

Cookies, bread, and pasta are also off the menu.

Allowed Foods

lipophilic diet

As you can see, the list of foods you can’t eat is very long. However, so is the list of allowed foods. You can consume fat-free red meat, fish, and poultry and make sure to avoid adding any fat when you’re cooking them. You can cook them steamed, baked, or in soups.

Other proteins that you can eat are egg whites, skim lactose-free milk, and low-fat yogurt. By consuming these foods, you reduce your risk of heart disease and bad cholesterol.

In addition, you can eat vegetables with stems and green leaves such as lettuce, celery, and cilantro since they’re the most beneficial due to the fiber they contain.

You can consume any fruit you want as long as it’s not on the list of forbidden foods. Just keep in mind that their excess consumption can affect your blood sugar levels, even if you choose the ones with the least sugar.

Conclusion

Now that you know what the lipophilic diet is, you can decide whether to follow it or not. Before making a decision, we recommend consulting your doctor to see if it’s right for you. Mostly everyone can follow it, but asking for medical advice never hurts.

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  • Damms-Machado, A., Weser, G., & Bischoff, S. C. (2013). Micronutrient deficiency in obese subjects undergoing low calorie diet. In Clinical Nutrition: The Interface Between Metabolism, Diet, and Disease. https://doi.org/10.1201/b16308