Things You Didn’t Know about Eggs

· May 31, 2015
So you think you know everything about eggs? Check out our article today and we may surprise you!

Eggs are a very common part of many people’s diet because they offer a lot of nutrients such as vitamins, minerals and proteins. Our bodies can’t produce these nutrients alone, so we have to get them from the foods we eat. Not to mention, eggs are low-calorie. Since eggs are so nutritious, we’ve put together a list of things that you just might not know about eggs!

Eggs are indispensable for people with special dietary needs, such as adolescents, pregnant women, the elderly, vegetarians and people following a low-calorie diet.

Egg color

Something interesting we should know about eggs is that their color is determined by the hen that lays them. If the hen is brown in color, her eggs will be the same color, while a white hen will lay eggs with a white shell. It just depends on genetics.

How to know if an egg is fresh

A raw egg in a container.

Despite what some people may think, figuring out whether or not an egg is fresh is really easy. You simply have to submerge it in water and make sure it doesn’t float.

A healthy way to prepare eggs

When you make fried eggs, you’re adding a lot of fat to the egg, which alters its natural properties, as well as those of the oil or butter. That’s why the best way to prepare eggs is to boil them for about 10 minutes; this will leave all the egg’s original properties intact.

The yolk

A closeup of a fried egg.

Anyone who has ever eaten eggs will have realized that some yolks are brighter than others. This color is a result of the hen’s diet, or whether she was raised in a henhouse, on the ground or in a cage.

Eating eggs when pregnant

It is very important for women to eat eggs while they are pregnant because, thanks to the choline in eggs, they contribute to the baby’s brain development during pregnancy.

Read more: Is Eating Eggs Good or Bad for You?

Benefits of eggs for the elderly

For senior citizens, eggs have the following benefits: they prevent vision loss, which tends to occur as one gets older, as well as muscle loss and cataracts.

Egg production and consumption

Some eggs in a tray.

Approximately 1.2 trillion eggs are produced each year. On average, one person consumes about 173 eggs per year and, though it may seem hard to believe, the Chinese eat about 40% of all eggs!

How many eggs does a hen produce?

People with hens often ask themselves how many eggs the hen will lay. Well, here’s the answer: on average, hens lay between 250 and 270 eggs per year, although in some special cases, they can lay up to 300 eggs per year.

Read more: Why You Should Eat Eggs Multiple Times a Week

Egg size

It is often hard to determine why different eggs are large or small. Simply put, it depends on how old the hen is; older hens tend to lay larger eggs.

How long do eggs last?

Someone cracking an egg into a container.

You can eat your eggs whenever you want, as long as you’ve had them for less than ten weeks. After this point, you’re better off throwing them away.

Can you wash eggs?

We don’t recommend washing eggs because this can damage the eggshell, which acts as a barrier for microorganisms that can harm the egg and make you sick. If you need to wash them, that’s okay, but make sure you wait an hour before cooking the egg so you can avoid any potential contamination.

Can you eat eggs if they’re cracked?

This is not recommended, because the cracks allow microorganisms to get into the egg, which can make you sick. Sometimes, an egg has a crack so small that we don’t even realize it’s there, so you should be very careful when preparing eggs so you won’t have any problems afterwards.

Everything you need to know about eggs…

Adding an egg to your diet won’t have any negative effects on your body. However, you should keep in mind that the nutritional properties of eggs depend on the way they are prepared. For example, a boiled egg is much better for you than a fried egg. An egg is a great addition to your daily breakfast!

  • Zeisel, S. H., & Da Costa, K. A. (2009). Choline: An essential nutrient for public health. Nutrition Reviews. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1753-4887.2009.00246.x
  • Gray, J., & Griffin, B. A. (2013). Eggs: Establishing the nutritional benefits. Nutrition Bulletin. https://doi.org/10.1111/nbu.12066

  • Miranda, J. M., Anton, X., Redondo-Valbuena, C., Roca-Saavedra, P., Rodriguez, J. A., Lamas, A., … Cepeda, A. (2015). Egg and egg-derived foods: Effects on human health and use as functional foods. Nutrients. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu7010706