The Surprising Benefits of Carrots

· February 1, 2019
Carrots are packed with vitamins and minerals which makes them a great addition in meals and face masks. Learn more about the surprising benefits of carrots in this article.

When people talk about the surprising benefits of eating carrots, you might think about how they’re good for your eyes or for getting a tan.

But this delicious vegetable does so much more than that. In this article, we’ll look over the surprising benefits of eating carrots.

Health benefits of carrots

Carrots are one of the most widely grown garden vegetables in the world. What’s more, they provide plenty of vitamins (A, B, C, and E) as well as antioxidants and minerals.

They also contain very few calories (33 calories per 100 grams) and can be eaten raw, grated, cooked, or steamed.

Carrots have so many good qualities that they should be a staple in your diet.

May postpone premature aging

Surprising benefits of carrots

Their folic acid, fiber, and magnesium, along with beta-carotene (which gives them their orange color) are like the fountain of youth.

These substances help your liver form vitamin A, which is vital to skin health, bone strength, and a healthy immune system.

What’s more, they protect your body from the harmful effects of free radicals (caused by smoking, pollution, or stress).

Eating carrots lowers your risk of degenerative disease and poor blood flow.

Want to find out more?: 8 Unknown Benefits of Carrot Juice

Support good intestinal health

When you have digestive issues, eating raw carrots may be able to help. The vitamin A in carrots protects and regenerates your stomach and intestinal membranes.

They’re advisable for people with:

  • Heartburn
  • Diarrhea
  • Constipation
  • Indigestion
  • Gastritis
  • Ulcers

Eating carrots on a regular basis may help keep your intestines in good shape. As a result, they can be very beneficial for those with irritable bowel syndrome, diverticulitis, or Crohn’s disease.

They help you recover from food poisoning, infections, and intestinal worms. And if you eat them boiled or steamed, they soften digestive mucosa.

Carrots are also high in fiber. As such, they’re great for helping to keep bowel movements regular and preventing hemorrhoids.

Good for mom and baby

Glass of carrot juice and carrots

Another one of the surprising benefits of carrots is linked to its Vitamin A content. It’s great for pregnant women or those who are nursing. It’s also a key nutrient for infants.

  • It allows new cells to form while providing antioxidants, calcium, and folic acid.
  • During pregnancy, mothers should eat 2 to 3 carrots a day to meet their daily needs of the above nutrients.

As for children who can eat solid food, a good option is a plate of boiled carrots.

If your baby is having digestive or intestinal problems, this is an ideal food. This is because it’s easy to digest, improves stomach health, and promotes the formation of red blood cells.

Regulates blood sugar

People with diabetes see notable improvements by eating raw carrots because of their carbohydrates.

That’s because they’re absorbed little by little, without leading to hyperglycemia. However, their glycemic index is higher when cooked, which is why they’re better raw.

Further, carrots improve blood circulation and eye health, two common problems in those with diabetes.

Boosts your immune system

Glass of carrot juice on table

We have to mention vitamin A and beta-carotene again since they allow for the proper functioning of your immune system.

A glass of carrot juice or a carrot salad is a great idea if you have the flu or a cold.

A good amount of vitamin A helps produce cells that fight against viral and bacterial attacks.

If you’re up against an infection or illness like that, make sure to turn to carrots.

Nourish your skin

Carrots absorb all kinds of substances that can build up on your skin. You can use them in the kitchen as well as in face masks (to treat acne, for example).

When used on your skin, they can help to soothe sunburns, thermal burns, wounds, and eczema. They’re also useful for protecting yourself from the daily effects of UV rays. However, you still need to use a good sunscreen to help protect your skin.

Applying a mask made of carrot pulp to your face for a half hour will help reduce the appearance of wrinkles. As such, carrots can help make your skin appear younger.

Invigorate your mind

Two glasses of carrot juice

Carrots fortify your mind by providing you two nutrients linked to brain health: phosphorus and potassium. Both of these may help regenerate nerves and counteract the effects of stress.

So, if you’ve been forgetting things or you’ve noticed that your mind isn’t keeping information like it used to, eat a few carrots.

Want to learn more?: 7 Things that Indicate Your Stress Levels are Too High

More surprising benefits of carrots

If you didn’t think the above was enough… they may also:

  • Strengthen your nails and hair.
  • Protect your heart by keeping your arteries plaque-free.
  • Reduce fluid retention and act as a diuretic.
  • Great for your teeth and gums, as they keep bacteria from sticking to them.
  • Stimulate your appetite (great for people with eating disorders).
  • Tang, G., Qin, J., Dolnikowski, G. G., Russell, R. M., & Grusak, M. A. (2005). Spinach or carrots can supply significant amounts of vitamin A as assessed by feeding with intrinsically deuterated vegetables. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/82.4.821
  • da Silva Dias, J. C. (2014). Nutritional and Health Benefits of Carrots and Their Seed Extracts. Food and Nutrition Sciences. https://doi.org/10.4236/fns.2014.522227
  • Fallahzadeh, H., Jalali, A., Momayyezi, M., & Bazm, S. (2015). Effect of carrot intake in the prevention of gastric cancer: A meta-analysis. Journal of Gastric Cancer. https://doi.org/10.5230/jgc.2015.15.4.256
  • Lima, A. A. M., Soares, A. M., Lima, N. L., Mota, R. M. S., MacIel, B. L. L., Kvalsund, M. P., … Guerrant, R. L. (2010). Effects of vitamin A supplementation on intestinal barrier function, growth, total parasitic, and specific giardia spp infections in Brazilian children: A prospective randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. https://doi.org/10.1097/MPG.0b013e3181a96489