Cleanse Blackheads: 4 Facial Masks

July 22, 2015
In addition to adding moisture to the skin, an aloe and tomato mask helps exfoliate, eliminating oils and dead skin cells and helping cleanse blackheads.

Blackheads are a type of acne and can appear anywhere on the skin due to lack of hygiene, an oily complexion, smoking, the use of unhealthy beauty products or personal genetic disposition, among other factors.

The appearance of these pesky spots is usually very unpleasant and unattractive, especially because they tend to pop up on or around the nose. Luckily, there are several natural ways to cleanse blackheads, and some of the best options are homemade facial masks.

If you want to start fighting blackheads now and get glowing, fresh skin, we invite you to try one of the following natural facial masks which are both affordable and effective.

Pineapple mask–helps cleanse blackheads

This is an excellent blackhead-fighting facial mask that works for people of all skin types. The pineapple helps keep the skin moisturized, remove excess oils, and free the skin from annoying, stubborn blackheads. In addition to this, when combined with honey it makes a powerful skin treatment that will leave your skin soft, radiant, and clean.

Ingredients

  • ½ cup pineapple juice
  • 2 tablespoons honey

How do you make it?

In a small bowl, mix the pineapple juice with two tablespoons of honey until well mixed. Before applying this mask, wash your face thoroughly using a cloth and then spread the mixture evenly over your skin. Leave the mask on for around 15 minutes before rinsing with warm water. Repeat at least 2 times a week.

Tomato and aloe vera mask

2 tomato jam helps cleanse blackheads

This powerful tomato and aloe mask is ideal for fighting blackheads as well as adding moisture to dry skin. It also works as an exfoliant, helping to remove excess oil and dead skin cells.

Ingredients

  • 1 small ripe tomato
  • 4 tablespoons of aloe vera gel
  • 1 tablespoon coarse sea salt

How do you make it?

Mash the tomato in a bowl and mix in the aloe vera gel. Once these ingredients are combined, add a tablespoon of sea salt and form the mixture into a paste. When ready, apply the mixture to the skin of the face and leave the mask on for 10 minutes before rinsing thoroughly with cold water.

Oatmeal and honey mask

Oats and honey are both great for skin care because they help moisturize the skin, remove dead skin cells, and leave a nice soft texture. This mask combines these two powerful ingredients, but unlike the other masks should only be applied to areas already affected by blackheads.

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon ground oats
  • ½ tablespoon honey
  • 1 egg

How do you make it?

Mix all ingredients together in a bowl until they form a paste, then apply only to the areas affected by blackheads. Leave the mixture on for 5 minutes. When time is up, rinse with cold water and repeat the treatment 2 to 3 times a week.

Egg and lemon mask

3 lemon

Egg whites and lemon help cleanse blackheads because they deeply clean the skin, removing dead skin cells and other impurities that cause those annoying blemishes. It’s important to note that this mask should only be applied at night because exposure to the sun can cause adverse side effects on the skin.

Ingredients

  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice

How do you make it?

First you need to separate the egg whites from the yolks, and beat the whites until they have a good texture. Then add the lemon juice and mix well in order to prepare the mask. Before applying this mixture to the skin, it’s very important to wash your face well with a cloth or another exfoliating product to allow the mask to achieve its full potential.

Once your face is clean, spread this mask over the skin and leave it on for 15 to 20 minutes. Rinse with warm water, and repeat this procedure at least twice a week. It’s also a good idea to put a little lotion on your face after using this treatment.

We hope these facial masks help you get rid of blackheads naturally! 

Dessinioti, C., Antoniou, C., & Katsambas, A. (2014). Acneiform eruptions. Clinics in Dermatology. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2013.05.023

Kroshinsky, D. (2011). Adolescent dermatology. In The MassGeneral Hospital for Children Adolescent Medicine Handbook. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-6845-6_7

Moradi Tuchayi, S., Makrantonaki, E., Ganceviciene, R., Dessinioti, C., Feldman, S. R., & Zouboulis, C. C. (2015). Acne vulgaris. Nature Reviews. Disease Primers. https://doi.org/10.1038/nrdp.2015.29