Detox Your Body with Foot Pads

· October 26, 2016
Some people say certain materials may help you eliminate toxins through your feet.

Detox techniques for the body are becoming more and more popular as more people are becoming aware of the need to cleanse the body to improve health. Today we’re going to be considering how you can detox with foot pads.

Constant exposure to toxins in the environment, a sedentary lifestyle and other bad habits have significantly increased the risk for many diseases.

When the body’s excretory organs have difficulties disposing of waste products, the waste may travel through the blood to the tissues and cells and cause adverse reactions.

Inflammation of the lower extremities and circulation problems are a few signs that indicate the body needs to detox.

For these cases especially, there are small therapeutic pads that have become really popular recently.

Why detox your body with foot pads?

A woman touching her feet on a bamboo pad.

Foot pads or foot cushions are sometimes used in the medicine of Japanese and other Eastern cultures. 

They have a similar effect to that of acupuncture. That is to say, they have a positive effect on the energy system of the patient.

According to Dr. Dietrich Klinghardt, from the American Academy of Neural Therapy, the main physiological effect of this detox method is the stimulation of the liver and kidneys.

This increases the metabolic rate so that the cells of both these organs can purify the blood and body.

The method is based on reflexology, an ancient healing art that uses reflex points on the soles of the feet to activate the body’s different systems.

Once these areas are stimulated, energy is channeled and relief is obtained from the corresponding organs.

Don’t forget to read: Use Lemon Peels to Heal Your Feet

Why place the pads on the feet?

Eastern medicine suggests that the feet are a “second heart” as they help pump blood and lymph back up to the torso.

This pumping action often slows due to a lack of physical activity, leading to a pooling of blood in the feet, ankles and calves.

In fact, remaining seated for a prolonged period of time makes it up to 50% harder for your blood to circulate.

This detox methods seeks to give the bloodstream an extra push to prevent more serious conditions from developing.

How do the foot pads work?

Feet on a bamboo mat with orchids on them.

The foot pads are listed as a therapeutic medical device and work as a poultice.

In Japan and many other countries, they’re found in many different forms, but they can also be made at home.

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon chopped garlic (3 cloves)
  • 1 tablespoon chopped onion
  • ¼ cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1 pair socks
  • Self-adhesive gauze pads
  • 1 small pot

Directions

Making these foot pads requires apple cider vinegar.

  • Add the vinegar to a saucepan and put on low heat.
  • Chop the garlic and onion and add to the vinegar.
  • Let simmer for about 10 minutes.
  • After the recommended time, remove from heat and let cool for 20-30 minutes.
  • Pour the solution onto the gauze pads until they are saturated, but not dripping.
  • Drain the excess liquid from the pads, while trying to keep the adhesive dry.
  • Place the pads on the soles of your feet and cover with socks to hold them in place while you sleep.
  • The following morning, remove the pads and throw away.
  • Note the dark brown color they’ve acquired.
  • For the detox process to be complete and effective, you’ll need to use the pads for two consecutive weeks.

Also read: Eliminate Foot Pain with Simple Footwear Guidelines

Keep in mind that on top of using this remedy, you’ll need to make changes to your lifestyle, including your exercise and eating habits.

After the two weeks, take a break. Repeat this process every 1-2 months. The idea is to perform a cleanse regularly to keep the body free of toxins.

Try this simple natural remedy. It might have a positive impact on your well-being.

Academy, A., Therapy, N., & Kingdom, U. (2002). The Klinghardt Neurotoxin Elimination Protocol. Neurobiology.

Mercola, J., & Klinghardt, D. (2001). Mercury toxicity and systemic elimination agents. Journal of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine. https://doi.org/10.1080/13590840020030267

Klinghardt, D. (2005). The 5 Levels of Healing. Explore!

Griffiths, P. (1996). Reflexology. Complementary Therapies in Nursing & Midwifery. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1353-6117(96)80005-9