5 Reasons You May Be Overweight That Have Nothing to Do With Your Diet

March 11, 2019
If you eat a balanced diet and still have weight problems, see a specialist to get checked out and rule out certain possible conditions.

People often associate being overweight with a poor diet. While the two are surely related to a certain extent, diet isn’t always the only culprit.

Here, we’ll tell you about several possible causes of weight problems that have nothing to do with what you eat.

1. Your liver

A liver inside of a body.

Your weight problems may be results of liver issues. It’s one of the most important organs in your body and is in charge of many aspects of your health.

See Also: Superfoods to Help Cleanse Your Liver

The problem is that if it starts to have trouble, your body begins accumulating fat in your midsection.

Symptoms

  • Elevated blood sugar levels
  • High blood pressure and cholesterol
  • Joint pain
  • Allergies
  • Skin problems

If you notice that you’re accumulating more fat in your abdominal area and you haven’t made any changes to your diet (and you eat well), it may be best to see a doctor because you may have liver problems.

Your ovaries

For women, the ovaries can end up being a source of weight issues.

This is because ovary issues can lead to hormonal imbalances. This makes your body store the carbohydrates you eat as fat, which can affect you whether or not you eat well.

Symptoms of poor ovary function:

  • Increase in body mass, even with a good diet and physical activity
  • Cravings for sweets and dairy
  • Weight accumulating in the lower part of your body
  • Pain in your ovaries

Thyroid problems

You may be overweight due to glandular problems.

As you know, your thyroids can make your weight skyrocket.

Your body regulates the rate at which it uses energy through your thyroids. This is related to how many calories you consume.

If they aren’t functioning properly, you may become overweight, even if you’re not eating much.

Symptoms

Your problem may be resolved by going to see an endocrinologist.

If you suspect thyroid problems, this may be the solution. This way, you can identify improper thyroid functioning early and take the necessary steps to keep it from getting worse.

You may be overweight due to adrenal gland problems

You may be overweight because of your adrenal glands.

Your adrenal glands are the ones that participate in the “fight or flight” instinct. In other words, they control how you react to stress.

When you go through stressful times, your body may respond with hormonal imbalances. This can lead to problems in many areas of your body.

In addition, these glands are also in charge of producing the stress hormone (cortisol). An elevated cortisol level triggers weight gain in your midsection.

Symptoms

  • Accumulation of fat around your stomach area
  • You carry your weight in your face and neck, not your arms or legs
  • High blood pressure
  • Elevated blood sugar levels
  • Weak muscles
  • Moodiness

If you think you may have weight problems caused by improper adrenal gland functioning, see your doctor and work on lowering your stress levels with lifestyle changes and exercises like yoga.

We recommend reading: The 5 Best Fat-Burning Aerobic Exercises Can Do At Home

Type 2 diabetes

A person pricking their finger to measure their blood sugar.

Type 2 diabetes could also be the reason for your weight gain. This is an illness characterized by an increased concentration of blood glucose.

This increase is often due to your cells not responding to insulin properly (also called “insulin resistance”).

People with insulin resistance have a higher concentration of glucose in their blood, causing obesity.

In fact, more than 80% of people with this type of diabetes are overweight.

If you think this may be you, see a doctor.

  • Organización Mundial de la Salud. (2015). OMS | Obesidad y sobrepeso. Nota descriptiva No, 311. https://doi.org/http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs311/es/.

  • Centre, W. media. (2015). Obesidad y Sobrepeso. WHO Web. https://doi.org/http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs311/es/.

  • Haua-Navarro, K. (2016). Sobrepeso y obesidad. Gaceta Medica de Mexico. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2012.0955.